Not everything was good in the media landscape during the last decade, so to balance out my previous top 10 lists I have to talk about the bad stuff. These are six games, movies, shows, or albums that greatly disappointed me. Disappointment involves having a previous liking, fondness, or hope in something, so I don’t necessarily hate the following but rather was severely let down by them.

6. Pokémon Sword/Shield

Pokémon Sword and Shield are fun games, I’ve already clocked more than 30 hours in my file. Despite this, they are very disappointing to me. These were the first mainline Pokémon games on a home console (Let’s Go Pikachu/Eevee don’t count) and developer Game Freak’s laziness is apparent everywhere.

The most obvious example is the cutting of more than half of the Pokédex, “Gotta catch ’em all” no more. The 3D models are evidently recycled from previous games, but they couldn’t bother to port all the previous ones over. Graphics look like upscaled 3DS visuals and feature horrendous pop-up that’s inexcusable in 2019. The world design is exteremely linear and boring, except for the Wild Area (that’s a cool idea). Max Raids are not fun, but rather frustrating and uninsipired. And the list goes on.

Still, these games sold like crazy and they do have some good stuff in it. The new Pokémon designs are still pretty creative and inspired and the music is amazing. Pokémon, I love you, but you can do A LOT better.

5. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

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I consider myself a moderate Harry Potter fan. I read all the books, even the fanfic-y script for Cursed Child (which I cannot judge as harshly without seeing the play) and watched all the movies. I respect and admire J.K. Rowling for her creativity and imagination that created a worldwide beloved franchise. I thought the first Fantastic Beasts movie was OK, I did enjoy it and hence thought that things could only improve in the sequel, right? Wrong!

The worst sin of The Crimes of Grindelwald is just how BORING it is. The plot is convoluted and suffers from too much characters doing nothing interesting. There are some very stupid story decisions, like the lame romantic misunderstanding between Newt and Tina, the shying away from Dumbledore’s sexuality, random, unnecessary baby murder (twice!), a surprise Dumbledore sibling (this might change in the following movies), Nagini is a human and serves nothing to the plot, and some more I’m probably forgetting.

J.K. writes good stories, but not good scripts. WB shouldn’t let her write the following movies, or at least bring in some help.

4. The Handmaid’s Tale (TV Show)

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The Handmaid’s Tale started out as a faithful adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel, the first season covering the original book. It was shocking, gripping, tense, frightening, and very socially relevant. Without more source material to adapt, however, the show turned into a repetitive, glacially paced torture porn borefest.

When you set up the rules for a fictional world, disregarding or ignoring them constantly breaks the suspension of disbelief and makes the story fall apart. June should’ve been killed a thousand times by season three, but her plot armor is so thick that there is no suspense anymore. The fakeouts of her escaping Gilead are so tiresome now that I don’t care anymore. Those lingering close-up shots with a monologue from Elizabeth Moss were interesting the first times, but after seeing them for the hundreth time you feel exhausted.

Meh. At least Atwood released The Testaments and gave a (arguably) satisfying conclusion to Gilead.

3. Utopia by Björk

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I’m all for experimentation in music, but Björk is just fucking with us now. Utopia is avant-garde pop that is not pleasurable to listen to. There are almost no hooks or interesting melodies to latch on to, the Arca beats are cringe-worthy to put it mildly, and songs are just too long without creating an interesting progression to justify it, they just fall flat.

To give her credit, she creates some pretty unique fairy-tale-esque atmospheres that are enjoyable, but would probably serve better as background music for a movie or videogame. By trimming the excess fat, getting rid of those awful glitch drums, and adding some more interesting melodies, this album would actually be very nice. Those nice flutes and inventive music videos are wasted here.

2. Silent Hill

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Silent Hill was once a very respectable survival horror franchise (I love 2 and 3 to death). Although it never reached Resident Evil popularity, it steadily gained its good reputation with its unique setting, monsters and psychological horror. The last decade, however, saw this reputation being dragged through the mud by stupid choices made by Konami.

The games after the fourth were not developed in Japan anymore and thus lost their unique Japanese horror sensibility. The two Hollywood movies were a mess, the second one in particular is one of the worst movies I’ve ever seen in a theater. The Silent HD collection was a horrible glitch-ridden mess that performed worse despite being in newer generation hardware.

And when things started to look promising again with a new game developed by Hideo Kojima, Guillermo del Toro and (almost) Junji Ito, Konami shut it down. How the hell do you fuck this up? Ugh. RIP Silent Hill.

1. Game of Thrones

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By now everyone knows Game of Thrones’ ending sucked. but this was a special kind of sucking because it retroactively made the series impossible to rewatch now, knowing it’s all for nothing. All the fascinating, complex characters and mysteries built during the previous years came crashing down violently. Nothing mattered in the end, the plot became nonsensical, characters turned into complete idiots, others were killed just to get rid of the clutter, and some others were kept alive because of fanservice.

The number one show in the last decade, the global phenomenon, the ratings (and piracy) king was killed in front of our eyes and we sat and watched and died inside. This show will go down in television history as a perfect example of how to turn gold into a turd. At least we have the books for a satisfying conclusion… Just kidding, George R.R. Martin will never finish them ☹️.

It’s time to list my favorite TV shows from the last decade. Since they tend to last several seasons, some might have not begun during the decade but did end in the 2010’s.

10. Game of Thrones

GOT

Game of Thrones was a phenomenon like none seen before in TV, a series that proved fantasy could be taken seriously as a prestige drama AND be immensely popular. For the first five or six seasons (debatable) the writing was top-notch and it seemed it was destined to become the best show of all time. Then the last two seasons happened and it all went to hell. Though the production values were always a sight to behold, even the best cinematography, score, acting, and special effects could not save an atrocious script. I don’t ever want to watch this series again and wouldn’t even recommend it, but it was superb before it crashed and burned.

9. Parks and Recreation

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On first impression Parks and Recreation would appear to be a The Office knockoff, but soon the show develops its own identity. It reminded me of early Simpsons when the humor was still grounded. The town of Pawnee is like Springfield, filled with goofy side characters. Leslie Knope is a refreshing main character, her comedy comes from being TOO positive and caring for others, which is very refreshing and makes the show very feel-good. Though it’s an episodic series, there were plot and character arcs that got resolved in the very emotional season finales. And above all, I have a massive crush on Adam Scott.

8. Dollhouse

Dollhouse - 2009

This extremely underrated Joss Whedon series barely made the list (the last episode aired in January 29, 2010). While never gaining the same cult following as Buffy or Firefly, Dollhouse was really entertaining TV. It had action, drama, sci-fi, comedy, and witty dialogue. The show also dealt with heavy existential themes and ethical dilemmas, some very similar to the ones Westworld would touch upon years later. And the plot twists were many and always very clever (except maybe one in the last few episodes).

7. Bojack Horseman

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An animated comedy about an antropomorphic horse celebrity living in Hollywood shouldn’t also work as an effective drama, but it does. Visual gags and quirky characters are everywhere, but undeneath it all there is an ongoing reflection on depression and mental health. It is fun and sad and very enjoyable. It would be higher in the list if it wasn’t for Todd (which annoys me to no end).

6. Puella Magi Madoka Magica

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Growing up I was a huge Sailor Moon fan, so the premise of Madoka was immediately appealing to me. What would happen if a magical girl show was deconstructed in a similar vein as Evangelion and the mecha genre? Young girls in super cute outfits, an adorable mascot, magic, and battles against mosters; these elements are all there but there is also darkness, grimness and real stakes at play (girls can actually die). The artstyle is very unique too, with monsters (aka witches) being represented in bizarre or abstract artstyles. The show is only 12 episodes (and a movie) but it was enough to leave a great impact on me.

5. XY

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Mexican TV series don’t really have a good reputation. Even today, the mexican shows put out by Netflix or Amazon tend to be average at best. But at the beginning of the decade XY proved that quality television can be achieved in my country. The show revolves around an editorial group that runs a men’s magazine. The show is unique in that it tackles issues of masculinity (hence the title) and what it means to be a man in contemporary mexican society. The show’s social critique is so sharp and the magazine eventually touches upon themes of politics and media influence that there was a rumor going around that higher ups wanted to cancel the show to avoid controversy. It is a crime that this show isn’t easily available to watch. 

4. Breaking Bad

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Everyone knows Breaking Bad is one of the best shows of all time, it is common knowledge by now. Walter White’s journey from unremarkable chemistry teacher to coldhearted owner of a drug empire is done so, so well that without even noticing you end up rooting for a despicable man, because we understand his reasons. The cat and mouse game between Walter and the authorities is always suspenseful to watch and the tragedy that befalls the family and Jessee is trully heartbreaking. When Walter finally (SPOILER) dies, after all the damage he caused you’re left with tons of conflicting emotions.

3. Peep Show

Peep Show

This show is HILARIOUS. The series follows Mark and Jeremy, two young men (I’m tempted to say losers) living their average lives in a flat in London. Mark is an uptight office worker and Jeremy is a slacker. They’ve got a very disfunctional and codependant relationship, that is very amusing to watch unfold. The gimmick of the show is that it’s shot in first person view and we hear the protagonists’ inner monologues. The formula works so well I don’t know why it hasn’t been replicated (to my knowledge). Episodes and seasons are short, so it is a very binge-able show.

2. Succession

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Succession is only two seasons as I’m writing this, but it has already blown me away. It shares some similarities with my number 1 pick, it’s a grounded drama elevated by its writing and acting, with some dark humor from time to time. The main characters are all interesting, (very) flawed people and watching Logan’s children struggle and fail to become the successor for a powerful media empire is a delight. 

1. Mad Men

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Mad Men is a show about an ad agency in 60’s New York and the people that work in it. There are no big special effects, action sequences, or crazy plot twists, just excellent writing and incredible acting. No other series has such fleshed out and flawed characters like Don, Peggy, Betty, Joan, Roger, Pete, or even Megan. They feel like real people and we care about them. Protagonist Don Draper is tragic yet compeling, a womanizing man who appears to have it all while self-destructing underneath the facade. Watching Mad Men feels like reading a novel, it’s very dense with content and themes that you could write tons of essays about it. The series is a slow burn, but so effective that Don and Peggy arguing over a commercial is a series highlight and one of my favorite scenes of all time.